Tag Archives: landscape painting

4 Plein Air Events Art Cocoon is proud to sponsor this Season

We are shipping 6 gift packs, 3 in each traveler size, to each of these awesome plein air events to be used as prizes.

PAAC_Letterhead transparent 2Plein Air Artists Colorado
20th Annual National Juried Fine Art Exhibition and Sale
Sep. 1-30, 2016.

 

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The 2016 Ohio Plein Air Society Competition
Sept. 23-25, 2016.

 

Fairfield Paintout
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Fairfield Paintout 2016 
October 4-8, 2016

 

 

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WOAW’s 46th National Exhibition
Nov. 15-Dec 13, 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

4 Things to Expect When Painting Outdoors: Tips from Jeremy Sams

Hey Jeremy — why do you paint IN the water?

“When the hot summer sun is blazing down on your shoulders and you’re surrounded by all kinds of rash-inducing foliage, painting IN the water just makes good sense!”

—Jeremy Sams, Landscape painter,
Archdale, NC, 9/28/15

Click here to read more about Jeremy…

1. Expect to be overwhelmed.
One of the biggest struggles is narrowing down my focus to one simple subject. Our tendency is to paint everything we see…the barn, the cow, the fence, the no trespassing sign, the weird tree with the broken limbs, and the cloud that looks like Donald Trump’s bad hair day. I’ve found that by using a view catcher you can isolate a particular view of a scene, and it makes it easier to see a dynamic cropping. Plus, it helps when you’re sketching out your composition.2. Expect to be uncomfortable.
I always advise people to bring bug spray, sunscreen, a light jacket, and an umbrella. There’s nothing more irritating than being unprepared for pestilence and weather when in a perfect scene. Because when you begin to paint you’ll have to swat the mosquitoes as they feed on you…and then, it will begin to rain…the rain will make you cold…you’ll struggle to paint with shivering hands…the sun will come out…you’ll warm up…you’ll get sunburned…and the mosquitoes will continue their lunch. It is a vicious cycle.

3. Expect the light to change.
You may have no more than a couple of hours to capture a particular scene. Large structure shadows will be slower moving while dappled light streaming through the leaves can create fast moving ground shadows. Overcome this painting challenge by finding the shadow patterns and light spots that best serve the painting—and then stick to the plan. Otherwise, you’ll spend all your time adjusting minor matters while the whole concept remains incomplete.

4. Expect panhandlers, con-artists,  spectators.
I usually park as near to my location as possible. If I’m only painting, I’ll leave my valuables locked up in my vehicle. It’s common to have pan-handlers approach. Here’s how I handle them: If they ask for money, I kindly ask them their name, first. Then, I say, “Sir/Maam, I’m sorry, I don’t have any money on me to hand out, but what do you need?” You can detect a con-artist from a person in actual need by asking specific questions. If they say, “I need food”, I’ll tell them to come back when I’m finished and I’ll go buy you some food (assuming I have the funds available). Those who have legitimate needs will be patient and accept whatever I purchase for them when I’m done. This approach may not be for everyone, so let your conscience be your guide. Just remember, don’t leave your painting gear unattended, and it’s good to have a painting buddy with you!

About spectators, I personally see their presence as a good thing, because they may be buyers, so have business cards to hand them. Also, it never fails that when you have established your shapes and composition, your spectators arrive. They usually give you that confused look as they glance at the subject matter, and then to your painting, and ask, “So, are you one of them thar’ abstract painters?” I use this opportunity to explain the benefits of my plein air process. Kindness goes a long way and just being friendly may get you a sale.


If you’re looking for an efficient, economical, and compact solution for carrying wet paintings, you’ll LOVE Art Cocoon Wet Panel Carriers – they go where you go!Enter our contest for a chance to WIN a FREE CASE of Art Cocoon carriers and become a FEATURED ARTIST!

Your images could appear in our e-commerce and print advertising materials, providing new exposure and opportunities!

Featured Artist, Jeremy Sams, painting in the water with Art Cocoons!


 

 

 

Jeremy Sams
“I used to not worry too much about carrying around wet paintings. I’d snicker a little at all the oil painters trying to be so careful not to end up wearing their buttery colors from their fresh plein air paintings. As for me, I’d just toss mine in the back of the car, and if it landed on its face, it was ok. I’m an acrylic painter. I could get away with that…well, could get away with that…not so much anymore. With experience, and lots of wasted dried up paint, I found the slow drying acrylics to be much friendlier to my plein air adventures. With this friendly new medium, however, I had to think twice before tossing my painting around. So, I found myself researching wet panel carriers.”There’s a whole market of different styles of wet panel carriers out there. I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to test out one of these. It’s called the “Art Cocoon”, a panel carrier designed to cocoon around your wet painting. It was designed by an artist for an artist and is made of a high quality, very stiff and durable cardboard. Your standard sized panel fits into the cocoon and is held in place by a few small strips of tape on the back of the panel. Then, the lid (another cardboard panel with matching space for your panel size) sandwiches your fixed panel. A large rubber band goes around the whole set-up, keeping it sealed. Now, your painting is cocooned.
I wanted to test just how tough this little thing was, so I strapped it to my kayak and headed up the New River in Ashe Co., NC. Luckily, my cocoon came with a sealable bag…which was good for the wet kayak trip, and just my luck…rain! I was pleased when I took the cocoon out and the only thing wet was the outside of the bag! Also, the tie down straps on the kayak didn’t affect its solid exterior, which was pleasing.

“One other thing I noticed and was pleased with, was that even though I had the cocoon in wet weather (although under an umbrella, and sealed when traveling) I didn’t notice any type of adverse effects on the cardboard material. However, I might not have had the same experience had I dropped the panel in the river. But I don’t know…maybe I’ll try that next time and see how well it floats…but only if it’s a bad painting.”

—Jeremy Sams, Landscape painter, Archdale, NC, 9/8/15

Click here to read more about Jeremy…

We’d like you to meet Jeremy Sams

Art Cocoon presents… from the woodland waters of North Carolina…
20 time plein air award winner…featured plein air artist… Jeremy Sams!!!
As a representational artist who works in acrylics, my primary goal is to capture on canvas the wonder and awe of God’s creation along with the scene’s emotional impact. In order to achieve this, it is of utmost importance for me to spend time studying and painting the particular scene on location, en plein air: to experience the sounds, the smells, the cool breeze or the humid air, and the movements of wind and shadows. All of these elements play a role in the emotional reaction we may have to a particular place.
Click here to read more…
“Finding Shelter”, 24″ x 30″ acrylic
This is a studio painting painted from a plein air painting that took 2nd place in the Burnsville Plein Air Competition this past May in Burnsville, NC. It’s a view looking up toward Celo Mountain during a typical summer storm. It has never failed to rain on me while painting in this area.
“Through the Woods at Renolda”, 10″ x 8″ acrylic
Reynolda Village in Winston Salem, NC is a favorite spot of mine in the spring and early summer. This day was spent studying the effects of light on the tree and path with the boat house through the trees.

Selling Paintings Off the Easel by Gloria Chadwick

We asked Gloria how she came to have so much success selling right off her easel.  She sent us the following:

In trying to explore how it was that I had some very recent sales while using the Art Cocoon carriers, I tried to rethink each situation for common patterns. All were in heavy tourist areas during a particular event such as, parade through a park, fairs, etc. In all of them, I quietly set up to the side and not the center of the gatherings. I believe that this filtered out the art lovers vs. the observers and made it easier for people to ask questions. I’m a retired psychiatric RN so listening is what I’m trained to do. So I listen and let people tell me about themselves—not me.

I know that these tourist areas lend to impulsive buying to take home a unique souvenir, a special memory of their visit. I don’t ask names, nor have them sign mailing lists. I don’t like being bombarded with signing lists, while on vacation, so I just don’t do it. I do have cards.

When they tell me how much they like the painting, I tell them they can tuck it away in their luggage and show them how it works and how safe the painting will be in the Art Cocoon. When asked about a price, I tell them how much my wildlife paintings of comparable size are and where I have exhibited. I tell them these plein air paintings are studies and quote the very much lower price. For the one and a half hour of painting that will conjure up happy memories for someone I feel it’s a win-win for both parties. I get the educational value of doing the painting plus some money to pay for my time and gas and they get something that no one else will have. It’s their own unique painting that they can say they watched the artist paint. When they ask to have their picture taken with it and the artist, that’s an added bonus. Then there’s the money collection.  I do carry a Square with me and take cash, check or their credit card with it. Most travelers like that little Square.

Learn more about Gloria Chadwick >>>

A Note from the Talented Tina Bohlman

TINA AT BIG BEND RIO GRANDE 2014We were thrilled to receive an email from Tina Bohlman!

“I don’t remember the exact year, but about 3-4 years ago, I received 3 each of the small and large as an Honorable Mention award in the Paint Historic Waxahachie plein air event. It’s a really great product. Every time I participate in an event or just a paint out gathering, artists always ask & I show them how “cool” the carriers are & give them the website. I give frequent painting demonstrations and always have my plein air gear, which includes MyArtCocoon! I have no idea how many of these I’ve “sold” for you, but I’m guessing quite a few.

Attached are some photos of my paintings on location inside the cocoon, plus a couple with me in the photo…the one showing me sketching has a fresh sheet of Arches Oil Paper in the cocoon on my easel. I paint on the new Arches Oil Paper and it’s a perfect match for the cocoon; I trim the paper to fit inside the 11×14 then place the 9×12 or 8×10 insert on that if I want to paint smaller. Same goes for carved out 12×16 – trim paper to fit & put inserts over if I want to paint smaller.”RIO GRANDEIMG_2321TINA - SKETCHING AT BIG BEND (contraband movie set)

Tina is a signature member of the following groups:
Outdoor Painters Society
Women Artists Of The West
Contemporary Fine Art International
Artists Of Texas
International Plein Air Painters

Check out her wonderful plein air work:
www.tinabohlman.com
www.tinabohlman.blogspot.com